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I'm a geek working as a distance learning specialist for a large corporation.

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Sorry, all, for the lack of posts lately. There were some delays as Caddickisms moved to a new server, and I didn't want to lose anything here or on myServer move complete

To review: I’m talking about an article on ZDNet that tries to make the case for streaming first-run movies to a home theater. In the first part, I laid out the argument theyMovie Theater vs. Home Theater (part 3)

SCI FI Wire | The News Service of the SCI FI Channel Looks like Heroes will air with a 2-hour, limited commercials pilot on Sept. 25th. Thereafter it will be onHeroes: Launch date

The Podcast Challenge Michael Allen is a very smart guy, and a leader in the world of e-learning. He knows the world of training and has spent a lot of timeMichael Allen's Podcast Challenge

Watchmen broke ground as a comic book/graphic novel. The movie was extremely faithful, with few exceptions, to the book. Is that a good thing? Going in to this film, I thought,Review: Watchmen

[This post was scheduled to go up last week, and I just realized it never posted. Anyone know how that could happen with WordPress' schedule function? I'm not waiting anotherMake a silent noise unto the Lord - Tuesday TubeWatch

Why Americans love to shoplift meat. - By Brendan I. Koerner - Slate Magazine Meat is the #1 item shoplifted from grocery stores. That has got to be one of theSwiping a sirloin is certainly stupid

Creating Passionate Users Risk aversion can take a good idea and make it useless. And risk aversion is rampant in corporations. That's one of the points in Kathy's post. It's aRisk aversion can hurt you

I had over 150 posts from LifeHacker in my Google Reader that I finally parsed through over the last 3 hours. There were a few that I may post aboutLinkList: LifeHacker edition

I got up this morning and read an email that referred to a comment made on Twitter... that's a Tweet, for those who've been under a technological rock for theTweet

I wasn't feeling well today, and there wasn't much on the tube, so I tuned in to the only movie playing that I hadn't seen before: Hellboy. In sci-fi, comic book,Review: Hellboy

Interesting premise for this one: two people live in the same lake house, one in 2004, the other in 2006, and yet, with the help of a mailbox-cum-time portal, theyReview: The Lake House

The Second Chance DVD Steve Taylor is no stranger to controversy. His music in the '80s was unabashedly pointed at issues of hypocrisy and general laziness within Christian communities and itsReview: The Second Chance

I've felt like I've been neglecting this blog lately, and wanted to get focused on it again. As it happens, I ran across the 7 day Challenge from Andrew Emmett'sIdentity: 7 day challenge

I've got a problem. There are multiple layers to this thing. And it's all George Lucas' fault. Well, maybe I have some part to play in it as well. But it'sThe Star Wars Conundrum

Elliott Masie & Josh Bersin: Learning Trends

Learning 2006 – Josh Bersin & Elliott Masie Dialogue

Josh and Elliot, two “thought leaders” in the learning industry, get together and talk about the things they’re seeing in the learning industry. It’s at least partially a teaser for Josh’s presentation at Elliott’s Learning 2006 conference, but there are some good things being said.

For example, Elliott, not for the first time, makes the beginning of a case to make a job in the learning field a part of a larger business career, not a career unto itself. There’s also a discussion about ROI and how it’s not really a sufficient, or even possible, metric to collect. Rather they’d like to concentrate on impact.

An underlying thought to much of what is said, is that learning is not necessarily tied to a “course” model, where you have content, test, content, test, etc. They argue that delivery should be more piece-meal, just-in-time, searchable, nuggets of content, with more of a performance support structure.

That concept is supported by new technologies like podcasts, blogs, wiki’s, RSS, and the like. Personally, I’m all for doing things that way. I’m trying to gently push my company into venturing into these territories (and let me tell you, that rudder is gonna be tough to move). That doesn’t mean abandoning formal classrooms and/or instructional design completely, but their point is a good one – sometimes you just gotta get it out there. They use their own discussion as an example of content that clearly has learning value, but was put together quickly and informally, with no slick interface and no instructional design.

Lest someone read into this that I am advocating dropping ID work, I’m not. I do think, though, that we need to start taking more advantage of technologies that support nuggets of content, and providing a way for the user/student to get directly to the piece they are looking for, rather than concentrating solely on full-blown training events, which is where many training organizations focus.

For a more in-depth look at that concept, listen to Elliott’s podcast on “Fingertip Knowledge“.

[tags]Josh Bersin, Elliott Masie, Learning in a Flatter World, industry trends[/tags]

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