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I'm a geek working as a distance learning specialist for a large corporation.

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At my house we have a bit of a push-and-pull relationship with time. My wife pushes, and I pull. Call me crazy, but I don't think we need to leave aRules for showing up

Lee posted his "Nerd badge" score recently. He failed to get it, and rightly so. Not because of any lack of nerd-dom on his part, but because of the idiocyThe Nerd Badge is invalidly valid, therefore I get one

Back in January, there was a major disaster in the world. Perhaps you heard about it? There was lots of media coverage. This isn't a trick question. I'm talking about theWalking the talk

On further reflection there is one more thing I want to say about The Prince Of Egypt. The second trailer (included on the DVD) paints the film as a "triumphFollow-up review: The Prince of Egypt trailer

Here are a few Science Fiction/Fantasy tidbits I picked up on the smoke-signal network recently. Like a ship wandering through the seas of Hollywood, it looked like Narnia sequel The VoyageSci-fi news roundup

I was one of the minority who didn't get out to see Night at the Museum in the theaters. I wish I would have. This is one movie I thinkReview: Night at the Museum

Slice of Scifi - Science Fiction TV & Movie News, Interviews & more » “The Dead Zone” Breaking News According to the shows creator/producer, Shawn Piller, the season starting next SundayThe Dead Zone: Back from the dead

Andre Agassi began the end of his professional tennis career tonight with a great match vs. Andrei Pavel. Like many people, I've been watching Andre Agassi for almost his entire career.Agassi's last first round win

The Wachowski brothers have a firm grasp of visuals and a healthy respect for graphic novels. They also know how to write a script that challenges the viewer's perceptions ofReview: V for Vendetta

So our water company had a break in at one of their tanks recently and while they're checking to make sure the water hasn't been contaminated, they've issued a "DoFact checking the easy stuff

There are a lot of challenges that instructional designers and trainers face in developing and delivering courses in a corporate environment. For instance, usually there is barely time to getChallenge students?! Are you crazy?!

I just ran across a blog that offers "Tips for Life". In two articles, they provide perspectives on how to deal with police officers if you are pulled over forHow to deal with Cops

Quicktime trailerI post this in remembrance of a hapless rabbit in a very early Simpsons episode. (Mike, you'll know exactly the scene I'm talking about when you reach the endTrailer: Hancock

Is it the "training industry" or the "learning industry"? (Yeah, I know there are plenty of alternates to make this even more confusing, but let's stick to these two forTraining vs. Learning

Lee has his weekly Top 5 list up over at Quit Your Day Job. This time it's the "Five songs that have left their footprint in my life." That's aFive songs that altered my perceptions

Corporate Learning conference: Day 3

I managed to get to David Snowden’s talk this morning about, essentially, the nature of learning. What does science say about how we learn? Is that different from the way we, as trainers, try to make people learn?

It seems that we are trying to fit a square peg in a round hole. And what we’re ending up doing is, sometimes painfully, reshaping the hole (the trainees) to become square, rather than filing our peg (the training) to become round.

Snowden (and his data) suggests that there is a point at which fragmented information, couched in the right amount of ambiguity, provides the optimal learning opportunity. This is in contrast to “ordered” systems, which provide things like Best Practice documents, Six Sigma (for which he seems to have a special disdain), and other detailed efforts that treat humans as if they were computers or machinery.

There is much that Snowden brings to the table for discussion. It’s a fundamental shift in how we currently act in many companies. I agree with much of his thoughts, though how to actually implement his ideas elude me (though to be fair to myself, I haven’t had much time to think about it, either). At a minimum, selling them to the corporation would be a challenge.

I found the presentation to be very conceptual/theoretical, and not so much implementation strategies.  He mentioned he has a degree in philosophy, and it shows… but that’s not really a bad thing. We need someone to bring this stuff up and challenge the status quo – which is in many cases blindingly obviously broken.

You can access the recorded session (you may have to register first – not sure) at the conference’s wiki (once it’s posted). It’s deep in psychology and cognitive theory, and jargon filled, but worth it – especially the first 20 minutes, which lays the foundation of his theory. I’ll need to go back and listen to that part again. I wasn’t taking good enough notes during the live presentation.

[tags]David Snowden, learning theory, fragmentation, CLTI2007[/tags]

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