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I'm a geek working as a distance learning specialist for a large corporation.

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To review: I’m talking about an article on ZDNet that tries to make the case for streaming first-run movies to a home theater. In the first part, I laid out the argument theyMovie Theater vs. Home Theater (part 3)

Everybody dies. Some of them more than once. Usually, that kind of statement is either a joke or a major spoiler, but then, this is a time travel movie, so IReview: Stargate: Continuum

Hero - it's a nice boy notion that the real world's gonna destroy. - Steve Taylor In the last couple of days I've seen two blog entries from totally unrelated blogs aboutHeroes?

My daughters and I are enjoying my new Hadrian's Walk Buff. They love the balaclava mode. I'm partial to the pirate configuration, myself. Unfortunately an eye patch is not included, but evenBuff/Not So Buff

December 21st. For years that date had been discussed ad nauseum. The date the Mayan calendar ended. The end of the world. It became a joke. I thought it wasLife After the End of the World: My Dad, the Mayans, and Me

Kilmer plans Genius return - Movie news - Movies - Virgin.net Okay, Real Genius was a pretty funny Val Kilmer movie. For the 80's. Making a sequel 20 years later... notA not-so-Genius move

Ohio Board Undoes Stand on Evolution - New York Times (free subscription required) The Ohio Board of Education voted 11 to 4 Tuesday to toss out a mandate that 10th-grade biologyOhio Board Tells Students, "Thinking Isn't Important"

Though it didn't do too well in the box office, this movie worked for me - all the way until the last scene. The end was the one place whereReview: Firewall

Finding Neverland wasn't boisterous, or exhuberantly full of wonder. It was, if anything, understated and simple in its execution. Despite the drama of a crumbling marriage, oppression, depression, and death,Review: Finding Neverland

So here we have week 4 of Stargate Universe and week 3 of Sanctuary. As I mentioned last week, on SGU they're heading for a close encounter with a star. It'sSyFy shows reviews: SGU and Sanctuary

SCI FI Wire | The News Service of the SCI FI Channel SCI FI Channel's award-winning series Battlestar Galactica will move to a new timeslot starting Jan. 21, 2007: Sundays atBattlestar Galactica moves to Sundays

Somewhere around 35 years ago, I caught my first episode of Doctor Who. I watched a man with a very long scarf run around offering people jelly babies in prettyThe Doctor Is In

Jason Bourne is at it again. Chasing down his past and removing people who get in his way with some amazing hand-to-hand take downs. The Bourne Ultimatum picks up right whereReview: The Bourne Ultimatum

Comcast.net TV - Colbert Raises $171,000 for Charity Okay, it's cool that he raised that much money, and it's funny how he did it, but this is what I love: Since returningStephen Colbert found hung between bathrooms

Slice of Scifi - Science Fiction TV & Movie News, Interviews & more » Paraglider Sucked Into Killer Storm Wow. This definitely qualifies as the craziest story I've heard about paraglidingFlying woman freezes, falls, and survives

Corporate Learning conference: Day 3

I managed to get to David Snowden’s talk this morning about, essentially, the nature of learning. What does science say about how we learn? Is that different from the way we, as trainers, try to make people learn?

It seems that we are trying to fit a square peg in a round hole. And what we’re ending up doing is, sometimes painfully, reshaping the hole (the trainees) to become square, rather than filing our peg (the training) to become round.

Snowden (and his data) suggests that there is a point at which fragmented information, couched in the right amount of ambiguity, provides the optimal learning opportunity. This is in contrast to “ordered” systems, which provide things like Best Practice documents, Six Sigma (for which he seems to have a special disdain), and other detailed efforts that treat humans as if they were computers or machinery.

There is much that Snowden brings to the table for discussion. It’s a fundamental shift in how we currently act in many companies. I agree with much of his thoughts, though how to actually implement his ideas elude me (though to be fair to myself, I haven’t had much time to think about it, either). At a minimum, selling them to the corporation would be a challenge.

I found the presentation to be very conceptual/theoretical, and not so much implementation strategies.  He mentioned he has a degree in philosophy, and it shows… but that’s not really a bad thing. We need someone to bring this stuff up and challenge the status quo – which is in many cases blindingly obviously broken.

You can access the recorded session (you may have to register first – not sure) at the conference’s wiki (once it’s posted). It’s deep in psychology and cognitive theory, and jargon filled, but worth it – especially the first 20 minutes, which lays the foundation of his theory. I’ll need to go back and listen to that part again. I wasn’t taking good enough notes during the live presentation.

[tags]David Snowden, learning theory, fragmentation, CLTI2007[/tags]

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