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I'm a geek working as a distance learning specialist for a large corporation.

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Yeah, I know it's January, but I just saw this and couldn't pass it up. Wow. I appreciate the sentiment, but this is someone with WAAAAY too much time (and money)A late Christmas overload

Though it didn't do too well in the box office, this movie worked for me - all the way until the last scene. The end was the one place whereReview: Firewall

I'm pretty sure my wife will have no problem confirming this: I'm addicted to The Sing-Off.  Last year's show blew my mind with the talent involved. This year matches thatThe Sing-Off: recap and predictions

I joined Facebook almost a year ago, if I remember correctly. I joined as an exercise for work. I was hearing a lot about how Facebook and similar social networkingI have a problem with Facebook, and it's Walt's fault

The Learning Circuits Blog: Scope of Learning Responsibility What is the Scope of our Responsibility as Learning Professionals? That's the question of the month, and it's clarified a bit in theLimits of Responsibility - ASTD's Big Question for March

I mentioned last week that I was a guest on a podcast over at Lee and Dan's Midnight Movie Club. The show has now been released so head over andGreetings, Program!

No, I haven't read the entire series in the last 12 hours. I have, however, read an excellent article that explains how much of my disappointment in the finale ofReview Addendum: Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows, pt 2 - book comparison

How should I spend my economic stimulus rebate? Over at Gather Little by Little (link above), Glblguy reviews his decision with his wife about what to do with his economic stimulusMy economic stimulus rebate is going to...

Easter is here! Aside from the obvious (and vastly more important) message, there are three notable things about church this morning: As a member of the choir, I have to be atHallelujah!

I've always loved drums. I can't remember a time when I wasn't "drumming." I put that in quotes because I've rarely actually had a drum at my disposal. I've beatDrum roll, please!

Somewhere around 35 years ago, I caught my first episode of Doctor Who. I watched a man with a very long scarf run around offering people jelly babies in prettyThe Doctor Is In

I've got a swirl of thoughts going on in my head at the moment. This one's gonna ramble. Hopefully it comes out making some kind of sense. I want to endI want to end my life, but I'm too lazy

In the 7 day challenge, today's topic is: Answer one question I think people visiting my blog may have. Let's be honest: I have no idea what question you guys/gals mayHow geeky are you, really? - 7 day challenge

Torchwood Lights Up May - Slice of SciFi In a recent interview with SciFi Wire, writer-producer Russell T.Davies (Doctor Who) stated that filming for the 13-episodes of Torchwood, the Doctor WhoTorchwood - Doctor Who spinoff

I read somewhere recently that comic books do superhero fights better than movies because things happen too fast in the movies. I understand where that's coming from, but I'm notReview: Superman: Doomsday

Corporate Learning conference: Day 3

I managed to get to David Snowden’s talk this morning about, essentially, the nature of learning. What does science say about how we learn? Is that different from the way we, as trainers, try to make people learn?

It seems that we are trying to fit a square peg in a round hole. And what we’re ending up doing is, sometimes painfully, reshaping the hole (the trainees) to become square, rather than filing our peg (the training) to become round.

Snowden (and his data) suggests that there is a point at which fragmented information, couched in the right amount of ambiguity, provides the optimal learning opportunity. This is in contrast to “ordered” systems, which provide things like Best Practice documents, Six Sigma (for which he seems to have a special disdain), and other detailed efforts that treat humans as if they were computers or machinery.

There is much that Snowden brings to the table for discussion. It’s a fundamental shift in how we currently act in many companies. I agree with much of his thoughts, though how to actually implement his ideas elude me (though to be fair to myself, I haven’t had much time to think about it, either). At a minimum, selling them to the corporation would be a challenge.

I found the presentation to be very conceptual/theoretical, and not so much implementation strategies.  He mentioned he has a degree in philosophy, and it shows… but that’s not really a bad thing. We need someone to bring this stuff up and challenge the status quo – which is in many cases blindingly obviously broken.

You can access the recorded session (you may have to register first – not sure) at the conference’s wiki (once it’s posted). It’s deep in psychology and cognitive theory, and jargon filled, but worth it – especially the first 20 minutes, which lays the foundation of his theory. I’ll need to go back and listen to that part again. I wasn’t taking good enough notes during the live presentation.

[tags]David Snowden, learning theory, fragmentation, CLTI2007[/tags]

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