About me

I'm a geek working as a distance learning specialist for a large corporation.

My Pandora "radio station" profile
This is my favorite way to listen to music now.

My Yahoo "radio station"
(Unfortunately, only works in IE.)

Shopping

Looking to purchase something online? Support Caddickisms by going through one of these links:

Caddickisms Store

Amazon.com

Calendar

March 2009
S M T W T F S
« Feb   Apr »
1234567
891011121314
15161718192021
22232425262728
293031  

Topics

Posts by month

Around the site

So your co-worker comes over and says, "Hey, you going to lunch today?" You say, "Sure. Where do you want to go?" "Well, there's Joe's Chicken Shack, or The Hungry Heiffer, orWheel of Lunch!

Literary characters - some obscure, some well known - abound in these graphic novels. The main players (Allan Quartermain, Captain Nemo, Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde, the Invisible Man, andThe League of Extraordinary Gentlemen, Vol. 1 and 2

Apparently, I'm prejudiced. Despite all evidence to the contrary, I persisted in believing an unfounded assumption rather than taking a few minutes to find out the truth. Because of that stupidity,I'm a prejudiced idiot

1500 Filipino Inmates Do Thriller - ectoplasmosis There is something disturbing about that guy playing "Michael Jackson's" girlfriend... actually there's something disturbing about the whole thing, but I just can't stopThrilling times for Filipino cons

I knew a few phrases from maybe 3 or 4 Johnny Cash songs before I saw this movie. I knew he had gone to prison (though I wasn't sure why),Review: Walk the Line

Yes, I know stupider isn't a word. It applies to Netflix nonetheless. I'll start this off by admitting that I don't have Netflix. I have used it at other people's housesNetflix becomes stupider, Warehouse 13 returns

Recently a North Carolina man named Tommy Jordan posted a video on Facebook in response to a letter his teenage daughter, Hannah, had written on Facebook. The video was intendedTommy Jordan: Parenting and Instant Fame in the Internet Age

» The Top 10 Most Quotable Geek Films…Ever! | Geekend | TechRepublic.com Wow, what a loaded topic. The Top Ten Most Quotable Geek Films... hmmm... to be included in my list,The Top 10 Most Quotable Geek Films

YouTube - Will It Blend? - Glow Sticks I can't believe I haven't seen this series until now. There are quite a few of these "Will it Blend?" segments and it'sThe Amazing GlowShake

Apple - Trailers - Iron Man - Trailer - Large Hey, the trailer for the May 2008 movie is out! Looks good, but I'm not totally sold yet. I'm a littleIron Man - Movie Trailer

(Originally posted Aug 06, 2005 on my older blog) Sci-fi western with an attitude, and a healthy dose of mystery and character building. I am catching Firefly on DVD. I didn't watchReview: Firefly

I just recently found out that two of my brothers-in-law didn't know anything about the new Clone Wars movie or the TV series it's setting up. This post is forStar Wars: Clone Wars videos (and an Obi-Wan debate settled)

Oh, great... another cause to spend our research money on. Duke Nukem Disease: Come Get Some! - Tuesday TubeWatch

Apple - Trailers - Spider-Man 3 Oh, man. I can't wait for this. I'm impressed by how many effects shots they already have done, and it's still a year before itSpider-Man 3 Teaser Trailer (w/Superman Returns)

Slice of Scifi - Science Fiction TV & Movie News, Interviews & more » Latest Doctor Who Rumor - It’s All Good! Rumor has it that the second season of DoctorDoctor Who Season 2 on Sci-Fi

Tuesday TubeWatch: Social networking will eat your brain!

It’s a popular debate lately: are these social networking sites (Facebook, Twitter, MySpace, etc.) bad for us? Recently an Oxford professor, Baroness Susan Greenfield, made some rather provocative speculations about the cumulative effect frequent use of these sites can have on our physical brains. As reported by ars technica:

Greenfield said that sites like Facebook, MySpace, Bebo, and Twitter may be forcing kids’ brains back into an infant-like state, as infants need constant stimulation to remind them that they exist. She added that she worries that “real” conversation will eventually give way to these little snippets of text dialogue, indicating that our normal language might eventually turn into pokes, wall shout-outs, and 140-character snark fests.

She’s also shown explaining her view in the video below (though to be honest I had a hard time following her).

As a result of her statements, a debate was born on a British news show. On February 24th, BBC Newsnight aired this segment:

They go back and forth about the issue. Sort of. I actually think the anchor, generally, did a good job.

Here’s what I learned from this debate:

  • Even with a British accent, snarky people are annoying.

(For the record, I know absolutely nothing about these individuals beyond what I see here.)

Both of these guys have useful things to say. It’s a shame they’re not having the same discussion.

This whole debate seems a bit twisted, actually. It’s supposedly about Susan Greenfield’s statements, but she’s not there to defend them—instead they got Aric Sigman (the ‘conservative’), who apparently has never met Susan nor was he involved in her research (or lack thereof). He did apparently also write something that was taken as alarmist on a similar subject, though he does a fairly good job, I think, of clarifying that his point is simply that there is reason to examine whether Social Networking sites, among other activities that reduce “face time,” could possibly have a negative effect on attention development. He cites similar studies (that no one refutes) on the effect of TV watching. More research is warranted. That pretty much seems to be his point.

He also gets around to parental responsibility in monitoring and limiting children’s time on the computer.

Honestly I’m not sure where the argument is here. Aric’s statements don’t sound alarmist to me. A bit of responsibility seems reasonable to request.

Ben Goldacre, on the other hand, won’t let go of talking about Susan Greenfield’s statements. He’s making valid points about policy setting, in the end, but they are not really directed at Aric as much as they are at Susan, who isn’t there. Childish looks of superiority abound.

What bothers me the most about this is that I think people will see this and relate more to Ben (as the “individual” raging against “The Man”) and discount Aric’s point almost out-of-hand. It’s not that most people would disagree with Aric’s points if they listened, it’s that they won’t really hear what he’s saying. Who would disagree that we need to pay attention to the amount of time our kids spend on the computer? That it would be helpful for them to cultivate ‘real life’ friendships and ensure that the proper time is spent on them?

What they’ll probably hear instead is that Ben is arguing that Facebook will not melt your brain and cause developmental disorders, so they’ll assume that Aric’s point is that Facebook will melt your brain and must be shut down. Which is nowhere near what he’s saying.

Gotta go… I need to Tweet about the problems I’m having coming up with my Facebook statuses.

(found via Corporate e-Learning Strategies and Development)

Tags: , , , , , ,

Leave a Reply

  

  

  

You can use these HTML tags

<a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>

CommentLuv badge