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I'm a geek working as a distance learning specialist for a large corporation.

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Learning 2006-2005 Information - Free PodCasts Video - CNN Pipeline I don't have a subscription to CNN Pipeline, but from what I'm seeing here it appears to be really interesting technologyCNN Pipeline: A learning perspective, & Blogs in learning

Last week I showed you something embarrassing: my desk. [caption id="attachment_1463" align="aligncenter" width="480" caption="My "Workstation""][/caption] I promised that I would show you a clean desk by Tuesday. Honestly, I wasn't sure itMiracles DO happen!

[caption id="attachment_941" align="aligncenter" width="604" caption="The Enterprise leaving the station"][/caption] Reviewing Star Trek (2009) is a bit of a difficult task. There is so much that has gone before, both good andReview: Star Trek

Parkin's Lot: Stupid in America Godfrey Parkin takes the notion (supported by a study) that America's public schools, on average, produce substandard education, and applies it to corporate environments. As he says,America's schools ineffective? Challenges for corporate learning

I talked about this one before, but I had to mention that I just watched a Mythbusters episode on the Discovery Channel that confirmed that impairment is at least asImpairment while driving on phone > drunk driving

SCI-FI to SCI-FACT: A Working “Spider Man” Suit - Slice of Scifi A “Spider-man” suit that enables its wearer to scale vertical walls like the comic and movie superhero couldWho's that wall-crawler?!

LiveDigital: NBC's Heroes pilot I don't know how this got there, but if you want to watch the Heroes pilot episode in a really bad, small, flash video format, there youNBC's Heroes pilot online

This thing has "inspiring Disney movie" written all over it. Two guys grow up in Cleveland with disabilities, both physical and environmental, join the wrestling team, and become inseparable friends. There'sESPN goes for the heart - Tuesday TubeWatch

This is one of a series of articles I wrote for The Coalition of Awesomeness blog some time ago. The blog has since gone to an unfortunate (but very awesome)Myths, Magic, and Legends – From Atlantis to Camelot

I don't follow football. At all. Never have. Most of the time I'm surprised to learn that the Super Bowl is on. I used to appreciate the commercials and watched mostlyWhy I loved last night's Super Bowl

SciFi.com: Science Fiction Movie and TV Reviews Oh, man ... I loved this show when it aired in UPN's fledgling season (kind of ironic that it would be released at theNowhere Man on DVD

I enjoyed the original Cheaper by the Dozen. [tag]Steve Martin[/tag] is one of my favorite comedic actors, and [tag]Bonnie Hunt[/tag] combines sweet and funny better than almost anyone. Adding [tag]EugeneReview: Cheaper by the Dozen 2

Stop, right now. Don't read anything else. Just click the play button below. Okay, I'll forgive you if hit the Expand button first. Seriously. Do it. Now. Did you watch it?Tron: Legacy - new trailer

Obviously the European fascists are being hurt by the global economic problems. In an effort save money, they've apparently let their entire marketing department go. While I applaud their frugality,Slow economy affects European fascist marketing

John Williams is probably the most well known film composer in history. He owes much of that success to the Star Wars series, but Jaws, Superman, Close Encounters of thePre-prequel-era Star Wars music tribute

Tuesday TubeWatch: Social networking will eat your brain!

It’s a popular debate lately: are these social networking sites (Facebook, Twitter, MySpace, etc.) bad for us? Recently an Oxford professor, Baroness Susan Greenfield, made some rather provocative speculations about the cumulative effect frequent use of these sites can have on our physical brains. As reported by ars technica:

Greenfield said that sites like Facebook, MySpace, Bebo, and Twitter may be forcing kids’ brains back into an infant-like state, as infants need constant stimulation to remind them that they exist. She added that she worries that “real” conversation will eventually give way to these little snippets of text dialogue, indicating that our normal language might eventually turn into pokes, wall shout-outs, and 140-character snark fests.

She’s also shown explaining her view in the video below (though to be honest I had a hard time following her).

As a result of her statements, a debate was born on a British news show. On February 24th, BBC Newsnight aired this segment:

They go back and forth about the issue. Sort of. I actually think the anchor, generally, did a good job.

Here’s what I learned from this debate:

  • Even with a British accent, snarky people are annoying.

(For the record, I know absolutely nothing about these individuals beyond what I see here.)

Both of these guys have useful things to say. It’s a shame they’re not having the same discussion.

This whole debate seems a bit twisted, actually. It’s supposedly about Susan Greenfield’s statements, but she’s not there to defend them—instead they got Aric Sigman (the ‘conservative’), who apparently has never met Susan nor was he involved in her research (or lack thereof). He did apparently also write something that was taken as alarmist on a similar subject, though he does a fairly good job, I think, of clarifying that his point is simply that there is reason to examine whether Social Networking sites, among other activities that reduce “face time,” could possibly have a negative effect on attention development. He cites similar studies (that no one refutes) on the effect of TV watching. More research is warranted. That pretty much seems to be his point.

He also gets around to parental responsibility in monitoring and limiting children’s time on the computer.

Honestly I’m not sure where the argument is here. Aric’s statements don’t sound alarmist to me. A bit of responsibility seems reasonable to request.

Ben Goldacre, on the other hand, won’t let go of talking about Susan Greenfield’s statements. He’s making valid points about policy setting, in the end, but they are not really directed at Aric as much as they are at Susan, who isn’t there. Childish looks of superiority abound.

What bothers me the most about this is that I think people will see this and relate more to Ben (as the “individual” raging against “The Man”) and discount Aric’s point almost out-of-hand. It’s not that most people would disagree with Aric’s points if they listened, it’s that they won’t really hear what he’s saying. Who would disagree that we need to pay attention to the amount of time our kids spend on the computer? That it would be helpful for them to cultivate ‘real life’ friendships and ensure that the proper time is spent on them?

What they’ll probably hear instead is that Ben is arguing that Facebook will not melt your brain and cause developmental disorders, so they’ll assume that Aric’s point is that Facebook will melt your brain and must be shut down. Which is nowhere near what he’s saying.

Gotta go… I need to Tweet about the problems I’m having coming up with my Facebook statuses.

(found via Corporate e-Learning Strategies and Development)

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