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I'm a geek working as a distance learning specialist for a large corporation.

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Around the site

Jason Bourne is at it again. Chasing down his past and removing people who get in his way with some amazing hand-to-hand take downs. The Bourne Ultimatum picks up right whereReview: The Bourne Ultimatum

A few things have bubbled to the top lately... here they are: Personal Finance Tom's Inflation Calculator I was looking for a calculator that would tell me how much my current salary wouldLinkList: Personal Finance + Sci-Fi edition

I despise the entire idea of Toddlers & Tiaras. This, however, I can totally get behind... Awesome. How many plugs for Tom Hanks' roles can you spot? Here are the ones I caughtCelebrity Toddlers & Tiaras

Literary characters - some obscure, some well known - abound in these graphic novels. The main players (Allan Quartermain, Captain Nemo, Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde, the Invisible Man, andThe League of Extraordinary Gentlemen, Vol. 1 and 2

Quick rant here... I'm currently pretty steamed at our medical benefits provider. We're in our Annual Enrollment period right now. Only 3 days left to decide which of 3 options isQuality Control Rant

In Minority Report, Tom Cruise's character was able to interact with a very cool looking computer desktop that he could manipulate with special gloves just by waving his hands around. [captionTuesday TubeWatch: Minority Report to Sixth Sense to PHUD - Interface Advancement and Integration

I've talked about Dr. Horrible before. It really is a great little musical. Well, now it's being released on DVD. I've started to shy away from buying DVDs, but IPre-order the Dr. Horrible DVD

To continue in the vein of dissatisfaction with training, let's take a look at the experience this high school student in Singapore is having with e-Learning (found via Corporate eLearningWhere are the humans?

I was giving Heroes the benefit of the doubt. Sure, they'd stumbled. The brother/sister Mexican road trip last season was a big mistake. This season was an improvement for a"Heroes" hits bottom and grabs for the shovel

Vanguard − The "Dilbert" guide to personal finance This list from Scott Adams, the creator of Dilbert, is about 2 years old, but I just saw it for the first time,Personal Finance advice from "Dilbert"

The Learning Circuits Blog: Homeschooling and the Creative Class Hm... Until a few years ago, I didn't know much about homeschooling. Then I met my wife. Her brother and sister wereHomeschooling and education

I think it's official: I'm addicted to Kathy Sierra's blog. Yesterday she made a great (if a tad long) summary of some pretty basic points she made earlier in the yearInstructional Design reminders

Star Wars: Community | ILM's Greenscreen Challenge Entry Stephen Colbert, of the Comedy Central's Colbert Report, issued a challenge to the public at large to put his lightsaber antics in frontStephen Colbert, a Greenscreen, and ILM

I wish I had found this before Halloween was over.... Zombies in Plain English Remember... Zombies Don't Dance! [tags]zombies, instructional video[/tags]Are you prepared?!

I could go on about the Academy awards snubbing Australia, or talk about the challenges CDs face in nature, but why should I make you wait for this just soAustralia's Best Sound Reproduction Expert

Tuesday TubeWatch: Social networking will eat your brain!

It’s a popular debate lately: are these social networking sites (Facebook, Twitter, MySpace, etc.) bad for us? Recently an Oxford professor, Baroness Susan Greenfield, made some rather provocative speculations about the cumulative effect frequent use of these sites can have on our physical brains. As reported by ars technica:

Greenfield said that sites like Facebook, MySpace, Bebo, and Twitter may be forcing kids’ brains back into an infant-like state, as infants need constant stimulation to remind them that they exist. She added that she worries that “real” conversation will eventually give way to these little snippets of text dialogue, indicating that our normal language might eventually turn into pokes, wall shout-outs, and 140-character snark fests.

She’s also shown explaining her view in the video below (though to be honest I had a hard time following her).

As a result of her statements, a debate was born on a British news show. On February 24th, BBC Newsnight aired this segment:

They go back and forth about the issue. Sort of. I actually think the anchor, generally, did a good job.

Here’s what I learned from this debate:

  • Even with a British accent, snarky people are annoying.

(For the record, I know absolutely nothing about these individuals beyond what I see here.)

Both of these guys have useful things to say. It’s a shame they’re not having the same discussion.

This whole debate seems a bit twisted, actually. It’s supposedly about Susan Greenfield’s statements, but she’s not there to defend them—instead they got Aric Sigman (the ‘conservative’), who apparently has never met Susan nor was he involved in her research (or lack thereof). He did apparently also write something that was taken as alarmist on a similar subject, though he does a fairly good job, I think, of clarifying that his point is simply that there is reason to examine whether Social Networking sites, among other activities that reduce “face time,” could possibly have a negative effect on attention development. He cites similar studies (that no one refutes) on the effect of TV watching. More research is warranted. That pretty much seems to be his point.

He also gets around to parental responsibility in monitoring and limiting children’s time on the computer.

Honestly I’m not sure where the argument is here. Aric’s statements don’t sound alarmist to me. A bit of responsibility seems reasonable to request.

Ben Goldacre, on the other hand, won’t let go of talking about Susan Greenfield’s statements. He’s making valid points about policy setting, in the end, but they are not really directed at Aric as much as they are at Susan, who isn’t there. Childish looks of superiority abound.

What bothers me the most about this is that I think people will see this and relate more to Ben (as the “individual” raging against “The Man”) and discount Aric’s point almost out-of-hand. It’s not that most people would disagree with Aric’s points if they listened, it’s that they won’t really hear what he’s saying. Who would disagree that we need to pay attention to the amount of time our kids spend on the computer? That it would be helpful for them to cultivate ‘real life’ friendships and ensure that the proper time is spent on them?

What they’ll probably hear instead is that Ben is arguing that Facebook will not melt your brain and cause developmental disorders, so they’ll assume that Aric’s point is that Facebook will melt your brain and must be shut down. Which is nowhere near what he’s saying.

Gotta go… I need to Tweet about the problems I’m having coming up with my Facebook statuses.

(found via Corporate e-Learning Strategies and Development)

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